Model Nails The Anxiety We All Feel About Being Tagged In Photos

Model Nails The Anxiety We All Feel About Being Tagged In Photos

Image via Megan Jayne Crabbe/Instagram

Model has an inspiring take on bad social media photos

You know that completely shitty feeling you get when you see a bad picture of yourself tagged on social media? Suddenly, you’re looking at every single unappealing detail on your face and body — the acne scars you had forgotten to cover up, the hint of a double chin, the tiredness in your eyes. The list feels endless and you quickly untag the photo — and then contemplate begging your friend to take it down.

Well, model Megan Jayne Crabbe is here to say that you should embrace those so-called bad social media photos. No, seriously. Her logic is actually pretty airtight. Crabbe, who blogs at Bodyposipanda, posted a side-by-side picture of herself that she had taken, and one that had been posted of her. The former is completely posed. The latter is totally candid.

Let's talk tagged photos. How many times has seeing a picture of yourself that someone else took thrown you down the body hate rabbit hole? I remember a time when seeing 'your friend has tagged you in a new photo' would make my stomach hit the floor. I would drop everything and rush to untag it. The only version of myself I wanted people to see was the carefully selected, highly edited, what I believed to be the most 'flattering' (read: thin) version. I was so convinced THAT was the only version of my reflection worth seeing, and what other people thought of it, was everything. These pictures are both me. On the same day. In the same clothes. Neither one represents me more or less than the other. Neither one is better or worse. But I know that's hard to believe about yourself. I know that when you see a photo of yourself the first thing you do is zoom in on all the parts you believe aren't good enough. That's why we struggle with pictures taken of us while we're just living – we weren't able to minimize those parts in advance. But the next time, before you zoom in, I want you to try something. Zoom out. To the whole picture. I want you to remember what that photo was for. It wasn't for the cover of a magazine. You weren't expected to look like an airbrushed supermodel. It was taken to capture a moment. That's it. How your hair looked or the size of your body doesn't matter. Remember how you felt. Remember that sight, that smell, that feeling, that joy. Remember the living. Zoom out (swipe…) and you'll see that the whole picture tells a much more important story than how you looked. And that every version of you is worthy of being seen. 💜💙💚🌈🌞

A post shared by Megan Jayne Crabbe 🐼 (@bodyposipanda) on

“These pictures are both me,” she wrote. “On the same day. In the same clothes. Neither one represents me more or less than the other. Neither one is better or worse. But I know that’s hard to believe about yourself.”

Crabbe went on to explain that she totally understands the inclination to pick apart all the flaws in your tagged photos. After all, you didn’t get the chance to carefully curate them before sharing them with the world.

When you stop making resolutions to shrink yourself smaller and smaller each year and choose to become MORE instead of less. 🌸 More gentle with yourself. 💐 More fierce in your beliefs, and more unafraid of letting your voice grow. 🌺 More open to healing from the things that hurt you in the past. 🌼 More unapologetically you. 🌻 And more accepting of HOWEVER that might look on the outside. Who else wants to spend this year thriving and living instead of starving and shrinking? Because we all deserve to become who we were supposed to be, before we were convinced that we needed to become less and less. Here's to being more. 💜💙💚🌈🌞 Photography by @johnsty89, completely unedited as ever 🌸 Lingerie is @asos #asseenonme

A post shared by Megan Jayne Crabbe 🐼 (@bodyposipanda) on

“I know that when you see a photo of yourself the first thing you do is zoom in on all the parts you believe aren’t good enough,” she wrote. “That’s why we struggle with pictures taken of us while we’re just living – we weren’t able to minimize those parts in advance.”

How many of your body insecurities come from being too big? Too soft? Too jiggly? Too much? Or in other words, too fat? We spend a lot of time talking about specific parts of our bodies that we've been taught to see as flawed: stomachs that aren't flat, thighs that aren't smooth, arms that wobble and backs that ripple. We don't talk enough about what all those supposed 'flaws' have in common, and why we've been taught to see them as flaws in the first place. The problem isn't individual body parts. The problem is fatphobia. We live in a culture that teaches us to fear and hate fatness. And by extension, to fear and hate fat people. We're taught a million different stereotypes about what fatness means: laziness, ugliness, unhealthiness, and above all, personal failure. These stereotypes are what allow people to justify the marginalisation of fat bodies, and the cultural fatphobia that's created is the root of so many of the things we believe to be 'flaws'. We don't need to work on accepting our stomachs or our cellulite, we need to work on dismantling fatphobia in all its forms. Stomach rolls aren't flaws because fatness is not a flaw. Arms that jiggle aren't flaws because fatness is not a flaw. Thighs that bulge or dimple or take up space aren't flaws because fatness is not a flaw. The only way that we free ourselves from diet culture and body hatred is by recognising that the real culprit is the fear of fat that our society has ingrained in us. Which means we have to confront the stereotypes and prejudices we hold about fatness, and unlearn the fuck out of them. We have to neutralise the word fat. We have to uplift and celebrate fat bodies that have been pushed to the margins of society for so long. We have to question the medicalisation of fatness. WE HAVE TO REDEFINE WHAT FATNESS MEANS IN OUR CULTURE. When we do that, nobody will have to wonder how they can accept a 'flaw' on their body that comes from being too fat, because they won't have been taught to see it as a flaw in the first place. 💜💙💚🌈🌞 Lingerie is @dearscantilly 🌸

A post shared by Megan Jayne Crabbe 🐼 (@bodyposipanda) on

You should look at the picture with a healthy amount of perspective, she said. Think about what you were doing when that picture was taken, and how you felt that day — not about how you looked at that exact moment, from that exact angle.

“Zoom out. To the whole picture. I want you to remember what that photo was for. It wasn’t for the cover of a magazine. You weren’t expected to look like an airbrushed supermodel. It was taken to capture a moment. That’s it…remember that sight, that smell, that feeling, that joy. Remember the living.”

Model Nails The Anxiety We All Feel About Being Tagged In Photos

“Zoom out (swipe…) and you’ll see that the whole picture tells a much more important story than how you looked. And that every version of you is worthy of being seen.”

So, basically, next time someone tags you in a picture you absolutely hate, take a deep breath, and zoom out. The feeling you had on that beach, or eating that amazing burger, will far outweigh some weird lighting. I promise.

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Model Nails The Anxiety We All Feel About Being Tagged In Photos

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