I Am A Recovering Alcoholic, And This Is What I Learned After Hitting Rock Bottom

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I Am A Recovering Alcoholic, And This Is What I Learned After Hitting Rock Bottom

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Giving up isn’t an option today. One mistake, one wrong decision, one moment of indulgence in self-pity will rip away everything and everyone who brings meaning and love to my life. To an outsider, my life may seem bleak: I live paycheck to (one week before) paycheck in a condo that is too small for my three children and me. It is not out of the norm for me not to know how I will put gas in my car or food on the table. My credit score is a whopping 450. I am divorced. I borrow money from my 70-year-old mother who also helps me with laundry and other household chores. At 39, I am only at the beginning stages of my first career. I am scraping by one day at a time, but I am overwhelmed with gratitude.

No one wants to visit the depths of emotional and physical pain that I have. My story is as sad as they get. Every alcoholic mother cliché is true. I am a low-bottom drunk. My final years of drinking were spent chugging vodka straight out of the bottle just to calm the shakes and nausea. My final drink ended with me driving in a blackout at 10 a.m. after disappearing from my place of employment unannounced. My visits with my children were supervised by court order. They still loved me, but I can’t comprehend how or why. They still had hope for me. They saw through the sour breath and the phony smile, and they knew the person I am today was hiding in there. They waited for me.

I was full of broken promises and empty apologies. I missed birthday parties, and I passed out in front of my children. Hangover after hangover, alcoholism told me I could drink today and not get drunk. Just a few to keep the shakes at bay, then I will stop. This is a disease that lies. This is a disease that takes over mind, body, and spirit and grabs hold of families and innocent children. This disease held me so tightly, and I danced with it for so long, believing the lies and forgiving its betrayal.

I was unemployable, undependable, and (I thought) unlovable. Alcohol was my everything. My best friend and lover. My courage and fear. My entertainment and bedtime story. My motivation to live and desire to die. Alcohol came before my kids, relationships, health, and sanity. I wanted so badly to want to stop drinking, but I still longed for alcohol to run steadily through my veins every waking moment.

During my final months of drinking, I began to sense the end was near. I didn’t make sense of it at the time, but I grew so scared of myself. I would enter a package store, and as I left I would think, something terrible is going to happen tonight. I would wake each morning to assess the damage. This became the beginning of the end. The disease was dying. I no longer felt invincible. I no longer believed the lies of alcoholism.

I bought a gallon of vodka knowing I would drink the whole thing that night. It scared me. I was preparing for my final surrender. Surrender came on February 3, 2014. I did not want to die. I knew I would lose my oldest daughter forever. I saw it in her eyes, in the way she was beginning to pull away from me. She would not be fooled by this disease much longer. That Monday morning, for the first time in my adult life, I believed, for a fleeting moment, that maybe, just maybe, there was a better way to live.

Detox. A 6-month inpatient rehab an hour and a half away from my kids. Intensive therapy. AA meetings.

I slowly learned to like some things about myself. I learned to do things sober. I relearned how to do everything sober. I danced sober, I laughed sober, I cried sober, and I felt things I had been numbing my entire adult life. I embraced a new way of life, and I made a commitment to myself to stay sober at all costs, just for today.

I have caused pain to those I love that I cannot take away. I don’t do that today. My children waited for me, and I am going to make sure their wait was worth it. Today I don’t care how much money is in my bank account or what my credit score is. Today I am sober, and that is my success story. I now live in acceptance, self-awareness, and gratitude, including gratitude for my darkest days because they made me who I am today.

A small glimmer of hope on a drunken Monday morning changed my life forever. Thanks to the program of Alcoholics Anonymous, growing self-love, and my family’s unconditional support, I have accumulated 1,347 days sober, one moment at a time. I have never been happier.

If you or someone you know is struggling with a substance use disorder, help is available. For more information, click here.